About

The Genomes and Genetics Department was formed in 2006, mainly from the teams of the Structure and Dynamics of Genomes Department led by Bernard Dujon.

The department has a staff of 170, working in 13 research structures, 4 technological platforms housed in the Institut Pasteur Genopole, and 6 associated research groups. The teams explore experimental and informatics approaches to determine the nature of genetic information in organisms of increasing complexity, ranging from bacteria and yeasts to humans.

Teams in the Genomes and Genetics Department work in 4 main areas:

  • Evolutionary genomics
  • The Three R’s (Recombination, Replication and Repair)
  • Functional and regulatory networks
  • Host–pathogen interactions

The teams use the full range of genomic and post-genomic approaches to study the various models that can be bacteria (chiefly tuberculosis bacilli, Streptococci, Vibrio, and Legionella), yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Candida albicans) or human models. The different pathogenic and model organisms are studied in depth with the aim of understanding how they live and what determines their pathogenic potential. Yeasts are studied, both for their own sake and as archetypes to facilitate our understanding of human genetics.

The department is also investigating the evolution of infectious agents and the selective pressures they have exerted on human genes over time.

The progress of these different research programs benefits greatly from developments in new sequencing and genotyping techniques which we are closely involved in given our links with the Institut Pasteur Genopole.

The Genomes and Genetics Department is also developing major in silico approaches in biological system modeling and bioinformatics analysis in addition to its own research projects and providing support to the Institut Pasteur’s various research structures in conjunction with the CIB.

The department was led by Antoine Danchin between 2006 and 2009.

News

Events

Test 1

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2017-02-25 00:00:00 2017-02-25 13:00:00 Europe/London Test 1 blablabla Institut Pasteur, Rue du Docteur Roux, Paris, France

Training on the Agilent Bioanalyzer

The Transcriptome and Epigenome platform (PF2) offers training on the Agilent Bioanalyzer Thursday, March 1 2017 from 10.00  to 12.00 am. (BioTop building, 2d floor, right, room 2.05. Warning: Lab coats must be worn […]

2017-03-01 10:00:00 2017-03-01 00:00:00 Europe/London Training on the Agilent Bioanalyzer The Transcriptome and Epigenome platform (PF2) offers training on the Agilent Bioanalyzer Thursday, March 1 2017 from 10.00  to 12.00 am. (BioTop building, 2d floor, right, room 2.05. Warning: Lab coats must be worn […] 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, Paris, France

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Next Seminar

Understanding the subversion of the host metabolism by Legionella pneumophila : new opportunities to tackle infection
Pedro ESCOLL-GUERRERO
Unité Biologie des Bactéries Intracellulaires
SEMINAIRE DU DEPARTEMENT GENOMES & GENETIQUE

Abstract: The intracellular bacterium Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire’s disease, infects and replicates within human macrophages. By using its Type 4B secretion system (T4BSS), L. pneumophila injects hundreds of bacterial effectors into the cytoplasm of the infected cell to subvert host functions. We have shown that L. pneumophila, by the action of the T4BSS effector LpSPL, subverts host sphingolipid metabolism and autophagy, a self-degradative process that is key for balancing cellular sources of energy and to remove intracellular pathogens. We have also revealed that L. pneumophila, by the action of the T4BSS effector LegG1, alters mitochondrial dynamics with important consequences in the metabolism of infected macrophages. These two studies converge in the “metabolic side” of host immunity against pathogenic bacteria. In this seminar, I will present and discuss our recent reports on the modulation of autophagy and mitochondrial dynamics by L. pneumophila, as well as present future directions of how to study the immunometabolic response of the macrophage during L. pneumophila infection. The results may allow to identify new targets to tackle infection

Amphithéâtre Jacques Monod, sous-sol bâtiment Jacques Monod – jeudi 23 février 2017 11:00

Contact: Comité d’animation des séminaires (animation-GG@pasteur.fr)

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