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Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The ISME journal - 19 Oct 2020

Stressmann FA, Bernal-Bayard J, Perez-Pascual D, Audrain B, Rendueles O, Briolat V, Bruchmann S, Volant S, Ghozlane A, Häussler S, Duchaud E, Levraud JP, Ghigo JM,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 33077888

Link to DOI [DOI] – 10.1038/s41396-020-00807-8

ISME J 2020 Oct 19. Online ahead of print.

The long-known resistance to pathogens provided by host-associated microbiota fostered the notion that adding protective bacteria could prevent or attenuate infection. However, the identification of endogenous or exogenous bacteria conferring such protection is often hindered by the complexity of host microbial communities. Here, we used zebrafish and the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare as a model system to study the determinants of microbiota-associated colonization resistance. We compared infection susceptibility in germ-free, conventional and reconventionalized larvae and showed that a consortium of 10 culturable bacterial species are sufficient to protect zebrafish. Whereas survival to F. columnare infection does not rely on host innate immunity, we used antibiotic dysbiosis to alter zebrafish microbiota composition, leading to the identification of two different protection strategies. We first identified that the bacterium Chryseobacterium massiliae individually protects both larvae and adult zebrafish. We also showed that an assembly of 9 endogenous zebrafish species that do not otherwise protect individually confer a community-level resistance to infection. Our study therefore provides a rational approach to identify key endogenous protecting bacteria and promising candidates to engineer resilient microbial communities. It also shows how direct experimental analysis of colonization resistance in low-complexity in vivo models can reveal unsuspected ecological strategies at play in microbiota-based protection against pathogens.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33077888