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© Michel-Robert Popoff
Clostridium difficile en microscopie à contraste de phase. On distingue des bactéries sporulées, non sporulées et d'autres en cours de lyse (destruction). Bactérie de l'environnement (sol, eau, foin, sable), elle est à l'origine d'infections nosocomiales survenant après un traitement antibiotique : Clostridium difficile prédomine alors que les autres bactéries de la flore intestinale ont été détruites. L'infection peut provoquer deux types de pathologies graves : les colites pseudo-membraneuses dont l'origine est quasiment due à 100 % à C. difficile et la diarrhée post-antibiothérapie due à C. difficile dans 30 % des cas de ces diarrhées.
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique
Starting Date
01
Sep 2013
Ending Date
01
Dec 2019
Status
Ongoing
Members
5
Structures
3

About

Biofilms are universal traits of bacteria defined as mixed species communities characterized by high cell density, reduced diffusion and heterogeneous structures. These characteristics induce behaviors and phenotype that are not observed in planktonic microorganisms and help biofilm cells to respond to environmental fluctuations and stresses. It has been shown that C. difficile (CD) forms biofilms as a single species or with other anaerobic intestinal bacteria on different abiotic surfaces and in different systems. Several factors including cell surface components and regulators have been shown to influence biofilm formation. Moreover, some environmental factors were found to induce CD biofilm formation. Recently we demonstrated that bile salts strongly induces biofilm formation by CD and cells within this biofilm are protected against the toxicity of the secondary bile acid deoxycholate (DCA), antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. Therefore, the ability of CD to form biofilms is likely to play an important role in its adaptive response to gastrointestinal stresses and re-colonization after antibiotherapy. To investigate the role of the biofilm formdbcaffegation in the CD infection (CDI), we are working: i) on the molecular mechanisms modulating biofilm formation in response to bile salts, ii) on the other stress stimuli triggering biofilm formation/dispersal in the context of CDI and iii) on the dynamic of the co-biofilm formation between CD and some commensal anaerobes of the GI tract, such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron or Clostridium scindens (In coll. with Genetics of Biofilms unit ; JM Ghigo, IP)

 

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