Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : The EMBO journal

Vezatin, a novel transmembrane protein, bridges myosin VIIA to the cadherin-catenins complex

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The EMBO journal - 15 Nov 2000

Küssel-Andermann P, El-Amraoui A, Safieddine S, Nouaille S, Perfettini I, Lecuit M, Cossart P, Wolfrum U, Petit C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11080149

EMBO J. 2000 Nov;19(22):6020-9

Defects in myosin VIIA are responsible for deafness in the human and mouse. The role of this unconventional myosin in the sensory hair cells of the inner ear is not yet understood. Here we show that the C-terminal FERM domain of myosin VIIA binds to a novel transmembrane protein, vezatin, which we identified by a yeast two-hybrid screen. Vezatin is a ubiquitous protein of adherens cell-cell junctions, where it interacts with both myosin VIIA and the cadherin-catenins complex. Its recruitment to adherens junctions implicates the C-terminal region of alpha-catenin. Taken together, these data suggest that myosin VIIA, anchored by vezatin to the cadherin-catenins complex, creates a tension force between adherens junctions and the actin cytoskeleton that is expected to strengthen cell-cell adhesion. In the inner ear sensory hair cells vezatin is, in addition, concentrated at another membrane-membrane interaction site, namely at the fibrillar links interconnecting the bases of adjacent stereocilia. In myosin VIIA-defective mutants, inactivity of the vezatin-myosin VIIA complex at both sites could account for splaying out of the hair cell stereocilia.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11080149