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© Research
Publication : Journal of cell science

EhPAK, a member of the p21-activated kinase family, is involved in the control of Entamoeba histolytica migration and phagocytosis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 01 Jan 2003

Labruyère E, Zimmer C, Galy V, Olivo-Marin JC, Guillén N

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 12456716

J. Cell. Sci. 2003 Jan;116(Pt 1):61-71

Entamoeba histolytica migration is essential for the development of amoebiasis, a human disease characterised by invasion and destruction of tissues. Amoebic motility requires both polarisation of the cell and formation of a predominant pseudopod. As p21-activated kinases PAKs are known to regulate eukaryotic cell motility and morphology, we investigated the role of PAK in E. histolytica. We showed that the C-terminal domain of EhPAK comprised a constitutive kinase activity in vitro and that overproduction of this fragment, in E. histolytica, caused a significant reduction in amoeboid migration, as measured by dynamic image analysis, indicating an involvement of EhPAK in this process. A dramatic loss of polarity, as indicated by the increased number of membrane extensions all around E. histolytica, was also observed, suggesting that the N-terminal domain of EhPAK was necessary for maintenance of cell polarity. To support this view, we showed that despite the absence of the consensus motif to bind to Rac and Cdc42, the N-terminal domain of EhPAK bound to Rac1, suggesting that the N-terminal region was a regulatory domain. In addition, we also found an increased rate of human red blood cell phagocytosis, suggesting for the first time an active role for a PAK protein in this process. Taking together, the results suggest strongly that EhPAK is a key regulatory element in polarity, motility and phagocytosis of E. histolytica.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12456716