Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of molecular biology

Probing Structural Changes during Self-assembly of Surface-Active Hydrophobin Proteins that Form Functional Amyloids in Fungi

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of molecular biology - 07 Aug 2018

Pham CLL, Rodríguez de Francisco B, Valsecchi I, Dazzoni R, Pillé A, Lo V, Ball SR, Cappai R, Wien F, Kwan AH, Guijarro JI, Sunde M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 30096347

J. Mol. Biol. 2018 10;430(20):3784-3801

Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins secreted by filamentous fungi in a soluble form, which can self-assemble at hydrophilic/hydrophobic or water/air interfaces to form amphiphilic layers that have multiple biological roles. We have investigated the conformational changes that occur upon self-assembly of six hydrophobins that form functional amyloid fibrils with a rodlet morphology. These hydrophobins are present in the cell wall of spores from different fungal species. From available structures and NMR chemical shifts, we established the secondary structures of the monomeric forms of these proteins and monitored their conformational changes upon amyloid rodlet formation or thermal transitions using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Thermal transitions were followed by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism in quartz cells that allowed for microbubbles and hence water/air interfaces to form and showed irreversible conformations that differed from the rodlet state for most of the proteins. In contrast, thermal transitions on hermetic calcium fluoride cells showed reversible conformational changes. Heating hydrophobin solutions with a water/air interface on a silicon crystal surface in FT-IR experiments resulted in a gain in β-sheet content typical of amyloid fibrils for all except one protein. Rodlet formation was further confirmed by electron microscopy. FT-IR spectra of pre-formed hydrophobin rodlet preparations also showed a gain in β-sheet characteristic of the amyloid cross-β structure. Our results indicate that hydrophobins are capable of significant conformational plasticity and the nature of the assemblies formed by these surface-active proteins is highly dependent on the interface at which self-assembly takes place.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30096347