Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PLoS pathogens - 17 May 2017

Rieck B, Degiacomi G, Zimmermann M, Cascioferro A, Boldrin F, Lazar-Adler NR, Bottrill AR, le Chevalier F, Frigui W, Bellinzoni M, Lisa MN, Alzari PM, Nguyen L, Brosch R, Sauer U, Manganelli R, O'Hare HM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28545104

PLoS Pathog. 2017 May;13(5):e1006399

Interactive access to open access publication:

http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1006399

Abstract

Sensing and response to changes in nutrient availability are essential for the lifestyle of environmental and pathogenic bacteria. Serine/threonine protein kinase G (PknG) is required for virulence of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and its putative substrate GarA regulates the tricarboxylic acid cycle in M. tuberculosis and other Actinobacteria by protein-protein binding. We sought to understand the stimuli that lead to phosphorylation of GarA, and the roles of this regulatory system in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. We discovered that M. tuberculosis lacking garA was severely attenuated in mice and macrophages and furthermore that GarA lacking phosphorylation sites failed to restore the growth of garA deficient M. tuberculosis in macrophages. Additionally we examined the impact of genetic disruption of pknG or garA upon protein phosphorylation, nutrient utilization and the intracellular metabolome. We found that phosphorylation of GarA requires PknG and depends on nutrient availability, with glutamate and aspartate being the main stimuli. Disruption of pknG or garA caused opposing effects on metabolism: a defect in glutamate catabolism or depletion of intracellular glutamate, respectively. Strikingly, disruption of the phosphorylation sites of GarA was sufficient to recapitulate defects caused by pknG deletion. The results suggest that GarA is a cellular target of PknG and the metabolomics data demonstrate that the function of this signaling system is in metabolic regulation. This function in amino acid homeostasis is conserved amongst the Actinobacteria and provides an example of the close relationship between metabolism and virulence.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28545104