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© Institut Pasteur/Antoinette Ryter
Salmonella spp. Bactéries à Gram négatif, aérobies ou anaérobies facultatifs à transmission orofécale. Les salmonelles majeures (sérotype typhi et sérotype paratyphi) sont responsables des fièvres typhoïde et paratyphoïde chez l'homme uniquement ; les salmonelles mineures (sérotype typhimurium et sérotype enteritidis) sont impliquées dans 30 à 60 % des gastroentérites et toxiinfections d'origine alimentaire. Image colorisée.
Scientific Fields
Diseases
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Published in Nature microbiology - 21 Mar 2016

Njamkepo E, Fawal N, Tran-Dien A, Hawkey J, Strockbine N, Jenkins C, Talukder KA, Bercion R, Kuleshov K, Kolínská R, Russell JE, Kaftyreva L, Accou-Demartin M, Karas A, Vandenberg O, Mather AE, Mason CJ, Page AJ, Ramamurthy T, Bizet C, Gamian A, Carle I, Sow AG, Bouchier C, Wester AL, Lejay-Collin M, Fonkoua MC, Le Hello S, Blaser MJ, Jernberg C, Ruckly C, Mérens A, Page AL, Aslett M, Roggentin P, Fruth A, Denamur E, Venkatesan M, Bercovier H, Bodhidatta L, Chiou CS, Clermont D, Colonna B, Egorova S, Pazhani GP, Ezernitchi AV, Guigon G, Harris SR, Izumiya H, Korzeniowska-Kowal A, Lutyńska A, Gouali M, Grimont F, Langendorf C, Marejková M, Peterson LA, Perez-Perez G, Ngandjio A, Podkolzin A, Souche E, Makarova M, Shipulin GA, Ye C, Žemličková H, Herpay M, Grimont PA, Parkhill J, Sansonetti P, Holt KE, Brisse S, Thomson NR, Weill FX

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 27572446

Nat Microbiol 2016 03;1:16027

Together with plague, smallpox and typhus, epidemics of dysentery have been a major scourge of human populations for centuries(1). A previous genomic study concluded that Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (Sd1), the epidemic dysentery bacillus, emerged and spread worldwide after the First World War, with no clear pattern of transmission(2). This is not consistent with the massive cyclic dysentery epidemics reported in Europe during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries(1,3,4) and the first isolation of Sd1 in Japan in 1897(5). Here, we report a whole-genome analysis of 331 Sd1 isolates from around the world, collected between 1915 and 2011, providing us with unprecedented insight into the historical spread of this pathogen. We show here that Sd1 has existed since at least the eighteenth century and that it swept the globe at the end of the nineteenth century, diversifying into distinct lineages associated with the First World War, Second World War and various conflicts or natural disasters across Africa, Asia and Central America. We also provide a unique historical perspective on the evolution of antibiotic resistance over a 100-year period, beginning decades before the antibiotic era, and identify a prevalent multiple antibiotic-resistant lineage in South Asia that was transmitted in several waves to Africa, where it caused severe outbreaks of disease.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27572446