Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique
Starting Date
19
Jan 2022
Status
Ongoing
Members
9
Structures
1

About

The Archaea are largely known as microorganisms thriving in extreme environments, but are in fact
ubiquitouly found in nature. Importantly, archaeal methanogens are also stable members of the human
gastrointestinal tract (GIT), where they can represent a substantial fraction. However, their role in health
and disease is largely understudied. A few studies have revealed that an imbalance of archaeal
methanogens is linked to different pathologies such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease, multiple sclerosis,
anorexia, and colorectal cancer. Despite these initial data, the study of the human “archaeome” is still in its
infancy, and currently among the main emerging topics in the life sciences. In particular, fundamental
research about the unique biology of human-associated archaea has been lacking. With this project, we
aim at a pioneering investigation of human-associated archaea. We will (i) understand how methanogenic
archaea evolved to adapt to the human environment (ii) characterize the cell envelope elements of these
methanogens and their involvement in this adaptation ((iii) investigate how methanogens interact with the
resident microbiome community and the host. This highly interdisciplinary project will provide initial
important information on a major and yet neglected component of the human microbiota, and open new
perspectives for a better understanding of the relevance of human-associated archaea in health and
disease. In particular, by providing key data on the cell growth and division of human-associated archaea,
it will open the way to the identification of potential targets for anti-archaeal peptides, as well as
understanding the possible role of archaea in dysbiosis-related illnesses.

Fundings