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© Research
Publication : Human molecular genetics

The giant spectrin βV couples the molecular motors to phototransduction and Usher syndrome type I proteins along their trafficking route

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Human molecular genetics - 23 May 2013

Papal S, Cortese M, Legendre K, Sorusch N, Dragavon J, Sahly I, Shorte S, Wolfrum U, Petit C, El-Amraoui A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23704327

Hum. Mol. Genet. 2013 Sep;22(18):3773-88

Mutations in the myosin VIIa gene cause Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B), characterized by deaf-blindness. A delay of opsin trafficking has been observed in the retinal photoreceptor cells of myosin VIIa-deficient mice. We identified spectrin βV, the mammalian β-heavy spectrin, as a myosin VIIa- and rhodopsin-interacting partner in photoreceptor cells. Spectrin βV displays a polarized distribution from the Golgi apparatus to the base of the outer segment, which, unlike that of other β spectrins, matches the trafficking route of opsin and other phototransduction proteins. Formation of spectrin βV-rhodopsin complex could be detected in the differentiating photoreceptors as soon as their outer segment emerges. A failure of the spectrin βV-mediated coupling between myosin VIIa and opsin molecules thus probably accounts for the opsin transport delay in myosin VIIa-deficient mice. We showed that spectrin βV also associates with two USH1 proteins, sans (USH1G) and harmonin (USH1C). Spectrins are supposed to function as heteromers of α and β subunits, but fluorescence resonance energy transfer and in vitro binding experiments indicated that spectrin βV can also form homodimers, which likely supports its αII-independent βV functions. Finally, consistent with its distribution along the connecting cilia axonemes, spectrin βV binds to several subunits of the microtubule-based motor proteins, kinesin II and the dynein complex. We therefore suggest that spectrin βV homomers couple some USH1 proteins, opsin and other phototransduction proteins to both actin- and microtubule-based motors, thereby contributing to their transport towards the photoreceptor outer disks.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23704327