Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Pierre Gounon
Entrée de Listeria dans une cellule épithéliale (Grossissement X 10000). Image colorisée.
Publication : Applied and environmental microbiology

Single-cell techniques using chromosomally tagged fluorescent bacteria to study Listeria monocytogenes infection processes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Applied and environmental microbiology - 02 Apr 2010

Balestrino D, Hamon MA, Dortet L, Nahori MA, Pizarro-Cerda J, Alignani D, Dussurget O, Cossart P, Toledo-Arana A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 20363781

Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2010 Jun;76(11):3625-36

Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen which invades different cell types, including nonphagocytic cells, where it is able to replicate and survive. The different steps of the cellular infectious process have been well described and consist of bacterial entry, lysis of the endocytic vacuole, intracellular replication, and spreading to neighboring cells. To study the listerial infectious process, gentamicin survival assays, plaque formation, and direct microscopy observations are typically used; however, there are some caveats with each of these techniques. In this study we describe new single-cell techniques based on use of an array of integrative fluorescent plasmids (green, cyan, and yellow fluorescent proteins) to easily, rapidly, and quantitatively detect L. monocytogenes in vitro and in vivo. We describe construction of 13 integrative and multicopy plasmids which can be used for detecting intracellular bacteria, for measuring invasion, cell-to-cell spreading, and intracellular replication, for monitoring in vivo infections, and for generating transcriptional or translational reporters. Furthermore, we tested these plasmids in a variety of epifluorescence- and flow cytometry-based assays. We showed that we could (i) determine the expression of a particular promoter during the cell cycle, (ii) establish in one rapid experiment at which step in the cell cycle a particular mutant is defective, and (iii) easily measure the number of infected cells in vitro and in mouse organs. The plasmids that are described and the methods to detect them are new powerful tools to study host-Listeria interactions in a fast, robust, and high-throughput manner.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20363781