Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Therese Couderc, Marc Lecuit
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Environmental microbiology - 04 Dec 2021

Palacios-Gorba C, Moura A, Gomis J, Leclercq A, Gómez-Martín Á, Bracq-Dieye H, Mocé ML, Tessaud-Rita N, Jiménez-Trigos E, Vales G, García-Muñoz Á, Thouvenot P, García-Roselló E, Lecuit M, Quereda JJ,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 34863016

Link to DOI – 10.1111/1462-2920.15860

Environ Microbiol 2021 Dec; ():

Studies have shown that ruminants constitute reservoirs of Listeria monocytogenes, but little is known about the epidemiology and genetic diversity of this pathogen within farms. Here we conducted a large-scale longitudinal study to monitor Listeria spp. in 19 dairy farms during three consecutive seasons (N = 3251 samples). L. innocua was the most prevalent species, followed by L. monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes was detected in 52.6% of farms and more frequently in cattle (4.1%) and sheep (4.5%) than in goat farms (0.2%). Lineage I accounted for 69% of L. monocytogenes isolates. Among animal samples, the most prevalent sublineages (SL) and clonal complexes (CC) were SL1/CC1, SL219/CC4, SL26/CC26 and SL87/CC87, whereas SL666/CC666 was most prevalent in environmental samples. Sixty-one different L. monocytogenes cgMLST types were found, 28% common to different animals and/or surfaces within the same farm and 21% previously reported elsewhere in the context of food and human surveillance. Listeria monocytogenes prevalence was not affected by farm hygiene but by season: higher prevalence was observed during winter in cattle, and during winter and spring in sheep farms. Cows in their second lactation had a higher probability of L. monocytogenes faecal shedding. This study highlights dairy farms as a reservoir for hypervirulent L. monocytogenes.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34863016