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© Christelle Durand
Microscopie d'un neurone. Le marquage jaune montre les synapses.
Publication : Neurochemistry international

Occurrence of manganese, copper and zinc in myelin. Alterations in the peripheral nervous system of dysmyelinating trembler mutant are at variance with brain mutants (quaking and shiverer)

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Neurochemistry international - 01 Jan 1987

Bourre JM, Cloez I, Galliot M, Buisine A, Dumont O, Piciotti M, Prouillet F, Bourdon R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 20501097

Neurochem. Int. 1987;10(3):281-6

Mn, Cu and Zn were present in mouse brain at concentrations that were 54, 4 and 14 times higher than in serum. In comparison with control animals, Mn was nearly normal in both quaking and shiverer dysmyelinating mutants. Cu was slightly higher in shiverer; Zn was higher in quaking only when expressed on a dry weight basis. The peripheral nervous system contained lower amounts of Mn, Cu and Zn than brain, (1 6 , 1 8 and 1 2 respectively). All three metals were much higher in trembler (4, 3 and 2-fold increase, respectively). Although higher in shiverer and quaking, Mn did not differ significantly from control. Cu and Zn were similar to control in the sciatic nerve of quaking and shiverer. Brain myelin contained Mn, Cu and Zn concentrations that were slightly smaller than those found in the whole brain. Mn and Cu were higher in the myelin from shiverer by approx. 2- and 3-times, whereas Zn was two-fold reduced. It is speculated that such metals play a role in membrane as cofactors of enzymes, especially those in control of free radical damage, and possibly also in membrane structures as phospholipid counterions.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20501097