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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : The Journal of biological chemistry

Molecular Basis of Membrane Association by the Phosphatidylinositol Mannosyltransferase PimA Enzyme from Mycobacteria

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of biological chemistry - 09 May 2016

Rodrigo-Unzueta A, Martínez MA, Comino N, Alzari PM, Chenal A, Guerin ME

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 27189944

J. Biol. Chem. 2016 Jul;291(27):13955-63

Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosyltransferase A (PimA) is an essential glycosyltransferase that initiates the biosynthetic pathway of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannoside, lipomannan, and lipoarabinomannan, which are key glycolipids/lipoglycans of the mycobacterial cell envelope. PimA belongs to a large family of membrane-associated glycosyltransferases for which the understanding of the molecular mechanism and conformational changes that govern substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis remains a major challenge. Here, we determined that PimA preferentially binds to negatively charged phosphatidyl-myo-inositol substrate and non-substrate membrane model systems (small unilamellar vesicle) through its N-terminal domain, inducing an important structural reorganization of anionic phospholipids. By using a combination of single-point mutagenesis, circular dichroism, and a variety of fluorescence spectroscopy techniques, we determined that this interaction is mainly mediated by an amphipathic α-helix (α2), which undergoes a substantial conformational change and localizes in the vicinity of the negatively charged lipid headgroups and the very first carbon atoms of the acyl chains, at the PimA-phospholipid interface. Interestingly, a flexible region within the N-terminal domain, which undergoes β-strand-to-α-helix and α-helix-to-β-strand transitions during catalysis, interacts with anionic phospholipids; however, the effect is markedly less pronounced to that observed for the amphipathic α2, likely reflecting structural plasticity/variability. Altogether, we propose a model in which conformational transitions observed in PimA might reflect a molten globule state that confers to PimA, a higher affinity toward the dynamic and highly fluctuating lipid bilayer.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27189944