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© Michel-Robert Popoff
Clostridium difficile en microscopie à contraste de phase. On distingue des bactéries sporulées, non sporulées et d'autres en cours de lyse (destruction). Bactérie de l'environnement (sol, eau, foin, sable), elle est à l'origine d'infections nosocomiales survenant après un traitement antibiotique : Clostridium difficile prédomine alors que les autres bactéries de la flore intestinale ont été détruites. L'infection peut provoquer deux types de pathologies graves : les colites pseudo-membraneuses dont l'origine est quasiment due à 100 % à C. difficile et la diarrhée post-antibiothérapie due à C. difficile dans 30 % des cas de ces diarrhées.
Publication : Applied and environmental microbiology

Global regulation of the response to sulfur availability in the cheese-related bacterium Brevibacterium aurantiacum

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Applied and environmental microbiology - 17 Dec 2010

Forquin MP, Hébert A, Roux A, Aubert J, Proux C, Heilier JF, Landaud S, Junot C, Bonnarme P, Martin-Verstraete I

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21169450

Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2011 Feb;77(4):1449-59

In this study, we combined metabolic reconstruction, growth assays, and metabolome and transcriptome analyses to obtain a global view of the sulfur metabolic network and of the response to sulfur availability in Brevibacterium aurantiacum. In agreement with the growth of B. aurantiacum in the presence of sulfate and cystine, the metabolic reconstruction showed the presence of a sulfate assimilation pathway, thiolation pathways that produce cysteine (cysE and cysK) or homocysteine (metX and metY) from sulfide, at least one gene of the transsulfuration pathway (aecD), and genes encoding three MetE-type methionine synthases. We also compared the expression profiles of B. aurantiacum ATCC 9175 during sulfur starvation or in the presence of sulfate. Under sulfur starvation, 690 genes, including 21 genes involved in sulfur metabolism and 29 genes encoding amino acids and peptide transporters, were differentially expressed. We also investigated changes in pools of sulfur-containing metabolites and in expression profiles after growth in the presence of sulfate, cystine, or methionine plus cystine. The expression of genes involved in sulfate assimilation and cysteine synthesis was repressed in the presence of cystine, whereas the expression of metX, metY, metE1, metE2, and BL613, encoding a probable cystathionine-γ-synthase, decreased in the presence of methionine. We identified three ABC transporters: two operons encoding transporters were transcribed more strongly during cysteine limitation, and one was transcribed more strongly during methionine depletion. Finally, the expression of genes encoding a methionine γ-lyase (BL929) and a methionine transporter (metPS) was induced in the presence of methionine in conjunction with a significant increase in volatile sulfur compound production.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21169450