Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Current topics in microbiology and immunology

From Genes to Networks: The Regulatory Circuitry Controlling Candida albicans Morphogenesis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Current topics in microbiology and immunology - 28 Oct 2018

Basso V, d'Enfert C, Znaidi S, Bachellier-Bassi S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 30368597

Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 2018 Oct;

Candida albicans is a commensal yeast of most healthy individuals, but also one of the most prevalent human fungal pathogens. During adaptation to the mammalian host, C. albicans encounters different niches where it is exposed to several types of stress, including oxidative, nitrosative (e.g., immune system), osmotic (e.g., kidney and oral cavity) stresses and pH variation (e.g., gastrointestinal (GI) tract and vagina). C. albicans has developed the capacity to respond to the environmental changes by modifying its morphology, which comprises the yeast-to-hypha transition, white-opaque switching, and chlamydospore formation. The yeast-to-hypha transition has been very well characterized and was shown to be modulated by several external stimuli that mimic the host environment. For instance, temperature above 37 ℃, serum, alkaline pH, and CO concentration are all reported to enhance filamentation. The transition is characterized by the activation of an intricate regulatory network of signaling pathways, involving many transcription factors. The regulatory pathways that control either the stress response or morphogenesis are required for full virulence and promote survival of C. albicans in the host. Many of these transcriptional circuitries have been characterized, highlighting the complexity and the interconnections between the different pathways. Here, we present the major signaling pathways and the main transcription factors involved in the yeast-to-hypha transition. Furthermore, we describe the role of heat shock transcription factors in the morphogenetic transition, providing an edifying example of the complex cross talk between pathways involved in morphogenesis and stress response.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30368597