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© Research
Publication : Toxins

Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications and Cytotoxic Properties of the Adenylate-Cyclase Hemolysin Produced by Various Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis Isolates

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Toxins - 26 Sep 2017

Bouchez V, Douché T, Dazas M, Delaplane S, Matondo M, Chamot-Rooke J, Guiso N

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28954396

Toxins (Basel) 2017 Sep;9(10)

and are the causal agents of whooping cough in humans. They produce diverse virulence factors, including adenylate cyclase-hemolysin (AC-Hly), a secreted toxin of the repeat in toxins (RTX) family with cyclase, pore-forming, and hemolytic activities. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are essential for the biological activities of the toxin produced by . In this study, we compared AC-Hly toxins from various clinical isolates of and , focusing on (i) the genomic sequences of genes, (ii) the PTMs of partially purified AC-Hly, and (iii) the cytotoxic activity of the various AC-Hly toxins. The genes encoding the AC-Hly toxins of and displayed very limited polymorphism in each species. Most of the sequence differences between the two species were found in the C-terminal part of the protein. Both toxins harbored PTMs, mostly corresponding to palmitoylations of the lysine 860 residue and palmoylations and myristoylations of lysine 983 for and AC-Hly and palmitoylations of lysine 894 and myristoylations of lysine 1017 for AC-Hly. Purified AC-Hly from was cytotoxic to macrophages, whereas that from was not.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28954396