Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Clinician Researcher
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Prize
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Melanie Blokesch, EPFL
Flagellated Vibrio cholerae
Publication : Nucleic acids research

Structural heterogeneity of attC integron recombination sites revealed by optical tweezers.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nucleic acids research - 28 Feb 2019

Mukhortava A, Pöge M, Grieb MS, Nivina A, Loot C, Mazel D, Schlierf M,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 30566629

Link to DOI – 10.1093/nar/gky1258

Nucleic Acids Res 2019 02; 47(4): 1861-1870

A predominant tool for adaptation in Gram-negative bacteria is the functional genetic platform called integron. Integrons capture and rearrange promoterless gene cassettes in a unique recombination process involving the recognition of folded single-stranded DNA hairpins-so-called attC sites-with a strong preference for the attC bottom strand. While structural elements have been identified to promote this preference, their mechanistic action remains incomplete. Here, we used high-resolution single-molecule optical tweezers (OT) to characterize secondary structures formed by the attC bottom (${{att}}{{{C}}_{{\rm{bs}}}}$) and top (${{att}}{{{C}}_{{\rm{ts}}}}$) strands of the paradigmatic attCaadA7 site. We found for both sequences two structures-a straight, canonical hairpin and a kinked hairpin. Remarkably, the recombination-preferred ${{att}}{{{C}}_{{\rm{bs}}}}$ predominantly formed the straight hairpin, while the ${{att}}{{{C}}_{{\rm{ts}}}}$ preferentially adopted the kinked structure, which exposes only one complete recombinase binding box. By a mutational analysis, we identified three bases in the unpaired central spacer, which could invert the preferred conformations and increase the recombination frequency of the ${{att}}{{{C}}_{{\rm{ts}}}}$in vivo. A bioinformatics screen revealed structural bias toward a straight, canonical hairpin conformation in the bottom strand of many antibiotic resistance cassettes attC sites. Thus, we anticipate that structural fine tuning could be a mechanism in many biologically active DNA hairpins.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30566629