Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : ACS chemical biology

Structural basis for inhibiting β-amyloid oligomerization by a non-coded β-breaker-substituted endomorphin analogue

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in ACS chemical biology - 19 Sep 2011

Frydman-Marom A, Convertino M, Pellarin R, Lampel A, Shaltiel-Karyo R, Segal D, Caflisch A, Shalev DE, Gazit E

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21892833

ACS Chem. Biol. 2011 Nov;6(11):1265-76

The distribution of endomorphins (EM) 1 and 2 in the human brain inversely correlates with cerebral neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), implying a protective role. These endogenous opioid peptides incorporate aromatic residues and a β-breaker motif, as seen in several optimized inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. The activity of native endomorphins was studied, as well as the rationally designed analogue Aib-1, which includes a remarkably efficient β-breaker, α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib). In vitro and GFP fusion protein assays showed that Aib-1 interacted with Aβ and markedly inhibited the formation of toxic oligomer and fibril growth. Moreover, Aib-1 prevented the toxicity of Aβ toward neuronal PC12 cells and markedly rectified reduced longevity of an AD fly model. Atomistic simulations and NMR-derived solution structures revealed that Aib-1 significantly reduced the propensity of Aβ to aggregate due to multimode interactions including aromatic, hydrophobic, and polar contacts. We suggest that hindering the self-assembly process by interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides may pave the way toward developing therapeutic agents to treat amyloid-associated diseases.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21892833