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© Mélanie Falord, Tarek Msadek, Jean-Marc Panaud
Staphylococcus aureus "golden staph" in scanning electron microscopy.
Publication : PloS one

Repression of invasion genes and decreased invasion in a high-level fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella typhimurium mutant

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PloS one - 25 Nov 2009

Fàbrega A, du Merle L, Le Bouguénec C, Jiménez de Anta MT, Vila J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19946377

PLoS ONE 2009;4(11):e8029

BACKGROUND: Nalidixic acid resistance among Salmonella Typhimurium clinical isolates has steadily increased, whereas the level of ciprofloxacin resistance remains low. The main objective of this study was to characterize the fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms acquired in a S. Typhimurium mutant selected with ciprofloxacin from a susceptible isolate and to investigate its invasion ability.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three different amino acid substitutions were detected in the quinolone target proteins of the resistant mutant (MIC of ciprofloxacin, 64 microg/ml): D87G and G81C in GyrA, and a novel mutation, E470K, in ParE. A protein analysis revealed an increased expression of AcrAB/TolC and decreased expression of OmpC. Sequencing of the marRAB, soxRS, ramR and acrR operons did not show any mutation and neither did their expression levels in a microarray analysis. A decreased percentage of invasion ability was detected when compared with the susceptible clinical isolate in a gentamicin protection assay. The microarray results revealed a decreased expression of genes which play a role during the invasion process, such as hilA, invF and the flhDC operon. Of note was the impaired growth detected in the resistant strain. A strain with a reverted phenotype (mainly concerning the resistance phenotype) was obtained from the resistant mutant.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, a possible link between fluoroquinolone resistance and decreased cell invasion ability may exist explaining the low prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium clinical isolates. The impaired growth may appear as a consequence of fluoroquinolone resistance acquisition and down-regulate the expression of the invasion genes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19946377