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© Research
Publication : PloS one

Insights into persistence mechanisms of a zoonotic virus in bat colonies using a multispecies metapopulation model

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PloS one - 22 Apr 2014

Pons-Salort M, Serra-Cobo J, Jay F, López-Roig M, Lavenir R, Guillemot D, Letort V, Bourhy H, Opatowski L

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24755619

PLoS ONE 2014;9(4):e95610

Rabies is a worldwide zoonosis resulting from Lyssavirus infection. In Europe, Eptesicus serotinus is the most frequently reported bat species infected with Lyssavirus, and thus considered to be the reservoir of European bat Lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1). To date, the role of other bat species in EBLV-1 epidemiology and persistence remains unknown. Here, we built an EBLV-1-transmission model based on local observations of a three-cave and four-bat species (Myotis capaccinii, Myotis myotis, Miniopterus schreibersii, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) system in the Balearic Islands, for which a 1995-2011 serological dataset indicated the continuous presence of EBLV-1. Eptesicus serotinus was never observed in the system during the 16-year follow-up and therefore was not included in the model. We used the model to explore virus persistence mechanisms and to assess the importance of each bat species in the transmission dynamics. We found that EBLV-1 could not be sustained if transmission between M. schreibersii and other bat species was eliminated, suggesting that this species serves as a regional reservoir. Global sensitivity analysis using Sobol’s method revealed that following the rate of autumn-winter infectious contacts, M. schreibersii’s incubation- and immune-period durations, but not the infectious period length, were the most relevant factors driving virus persistence.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24755619