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© Pierre Gounon
Entrée de Listeria dans une cellule épithéliale (Grossissement X 10000). Image colorisée.
Publication : Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine

Epigenetics and bacterial infections

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine - 01 Dec 2012

Bierne H, Hamon M, Cossart P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23209181

Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 2012 Dec;2(12):a010272

Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23209181