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  • whocc
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  • Associate Professor
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  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
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  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
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  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
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© Research
Publication : Viruses

Arboviruses and Muscle Disorders: From Disease to Cell Biology.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Viruses - 05 Jun 2020

Filippone C, Legros V, Jeannin P, Choumet V, Butler-Browne G, Zoladek J, Mouly V, Gessain A, Ceccaldi PE,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 32516914

Link to DOI – E61610.3390/v12060616

Viruses 2020 06; 12(6):

Infections due to arboviruses (arthropod-borne viruses) have dramatically increased worldwide during the last few years. In humans, symptoms associated with acute infection of most arboviruses are often described as “dengue-like syndrome”, including fever, rash, conjunctivitis, arthralgia, and muscular symptoms such as myalgia, myositis, or rhabdomyolysis. In some cases, muscular symptoms may persist over months, especially following flavivirus and alphavirus infections. However, in humans the cellular targets of infection in muscle have been rarely identified. Animal models provide insights to elucidate pathological mechanisms through studying viral tropism, viral-induced inflammation, or potential viral persistence in the muscle compartment. The tropism of arboviruses for muscle cells as well as the viral-induced cytopathic effect and cellular alterations can be confirmed in vitro using cellular models. This review describes the link between muscle alterations and arbovirus infection, and the underlying mechanisms.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32516914