Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Tubercle and lung disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease

Analysis of the proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in silico

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Tubercle and lung disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease - 01 Jan 1999

Tekaia F, Gordon SV, Garnier T, Brosch R, Barrell BG, Cole ST

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10694977

Tuber. Lung Dis. 1999;79(6):329-42

Novel bioinformatics routines have been used to provide a more detailed definition of the proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Over half of the current proteins result from gene duplication or domain shuffling events while one-sixth show no similarity to polypeptides described in other organisms. Prominent among the genes that appear to have been duplicated on numerous occasions are those involved in fatty acid metabolism, regulation of gene expression, and the unusually glycine-rich PE and PPE proteins. Protein similarity analysis, coupled with inspection of the genetic neighbourhood, was used to explore possible functional relatedness. This uncovered four large mce operons whose proteins may mediate initial interactions between the tubercle bacillus and host cells, together with a cluster of genes that might encode components of a structure required for secretion of ESAT-6 like proteins. Close linkage of the mmpL genes, encoding large membrane proteins, with those required for fatty acid metabolism suggests involvement in lipid transport. Compared to free-living bacteria, M. tuberculosis has a significantly smaller transport protein repertoire and this may reflect its intracellular lifestyle.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10694977