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© Research
Publication : RNA (New York, N.Y.)

A snoRNA that guides the two most conserved pseudouridine modifications within rRNA confers a growth advantage in yeast

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in RNA (New York, N.Y.) - 01 Jul 2003

Badis G, Fromont-Racine M, Jacquier A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 12810910

RNA 2003 Jul;9(7):771-9

Ribosomal RNAs contain a number of modified nucleotides. The most abundant nucleotide modifications found within rRNAs fall into two types: 2′-O-ribose methylations and pseudouridylations. In eukaryotes, small nucleolar guide RNAs, the snoRNAs that are the RNA components of the snoRNPs, specify the position of these modifications. The 2′-O-ribose methylations and pseudouridylations are guided by the box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs, respectively. The role of these modifications in rRNA remains poorly understood as no clear phenotype has yet been assigned to the absence of specific 2′-O-ribose methylations or pseudouridylations. Only very recently, a slight translation defect and perturbation of polysome profiles was reported in yeast for the absence of the Psi at position 2919 within the LSU rRNA. Here we report the identification and characterization in yeast of a novel intronic H/ACA snoRNA that we called snR191 and that guides pseudouridylation at positions 2258 and 2260 in the LSU rRNA. Most interestingly, these two modified bases are the most conserved pseudouridines from bacteria to human in rRNA. The corresponding human snoRNA is hU19. We show here that, in yeast, the presence of this snoRNA, and hence, most likely, of the conserved pseudouridines it specifies, is not essential for viability but provides a growth advantage to the cell.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12810910