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© Research
Publication : Journal of cell science

A role for microtubule dynamics in phagosome movement

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 01 Feb 1998

Blocker A, Griffiths G, Olivo JC, Hyman AA, Severin FF

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 9427679

J. Cell. Sci. 1998 Feb;111 ( Pt 3):303-12

We have shown previously that intracellular phagosome movement requires microtubules. Here we provide evidence that within cells phagosomes display two different kinds of microtubule-based movements in approximately equal proportions. The first type occurs predominantly in the cell periphery, often shortly after the phagosome is formed, and at speeds below 0.1 microm/second. The second is faster (0.2-1.5 micron/second) and occurs mainly after phagosomes have reached the cell interior. Treating cells with nanomolar concentrations of taxol or nocodazole alters microtubule dynamics without affecting either total polymer mass or microtubule organisation. Such treatments slow the accumulation of phagosomes in the perinuclear region and reduce the number of slow movements by up to 50% without affecting the frequency of fast movements. This suggests that a proportion of slow movements are mediated by microtubule dynamics while fast movements are powered by microtubule motors. In macrophages, interphase microtubules radiate from the microtubule organising centre with their plus-end towards the cell periphery. To understand the behaviour of ‘early’ phagosomes at the cell periphery we investigated their ability to bind microtubule plus-ends in vitro. We show that early phagosomes have a strong preference for microtubule plus-ends, whereas ‘late’ phagosomes do not, and that plus-end affinity requires the presence of microtubule-associated proteins within cytosol. We suggest that phagosomes can bind to the plus-ends of dynamic microtubules and move by following their shrinkage or growth.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9427679