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© Research
Publication : Molecular microbiology

Transcriptional slippage controls production of type III secretion apparatus components in Shigella flexneri

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular microbiology - 24 Oct 2006

Penno C, Hachani A, Biskri L, Sansonetti P, Allaoui A, Parsot C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17059566

Mol. Microbiol. 2006 Dec;62(5):1460-8

During transcription, series of approximately 9 As or Ts can direct RNA polymerase to incorporate into the mRNA nucleotides not encoded by the DNA, changing the reading frame downstream from the slippage site. We detected series of 9 or 10 As in spa13, spa33 and mxiA encoding type III secretion apparatus components. Analysis of cDNAs indicated that transcriptional slippage occurs in spa13, mxiA and spa33. Changes in the reading frame were confirmed by using plasmids carrying slippage sites in the 5′ part of lacZ. Slippage is required for production of Spa13 from two overlapping reading frames and should lead to production of truncated MxiA and Spa33 proteins. Complementation of spa13 and mxiA mutants with plasmids carrying altered sites indicated that slippage in spa13 is required for assembly of the secretion apparatus and that slippage sites in spa13 and mxiA have not been selected to encode Lys residues or to produce two proteins endowed with different activities. The presence of slippage sites decreases production of Spa13 by 70%, of MxiA and Spa33 by 15% and of Spa32 (encoded downstream from spa13) by 50%. These results suggest that transcriptional slippage controls protein production by reducing the proportion of mRNA translated into functional proteins.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17059566