Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Microbiology (Reading, England)

The replication-related organization of bacterial genomes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Microbiology (Reading, England) - 01 Jun 2004

Rocha EP

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15184548

Microbiology (Reading, Engl.) 2004 Jun;150(Pt 6):1609-27

The replication of the chromosome is among the most essential functions of the bacterial cell and influences many other cellular mechanisms, from gene expression to cell division. Yet the way it impacts on the bacterial chromosome was not fully acknowledged until the availability of complete genomes allowed one to look upon genomes as more than bags of genes. Chromosomal replication includes a set of asymmetric mechanisms, among which are a division in a lagging and a leading strand and a gradient between early and late replicating regions. These differences are the causes of many of the organizational features observed in bacterial genomes, in terms of both gene distribution and sequence composition along the chromosome. When asymmetries or gradients increase in some genomes, e.g. due to a different composition of the DNA polymerase or to a higher growth rate, so do the corresponding biases. As some of the features of the chromosome structure seem to be under strong selection, understanding such biases is important for the understanding of chromosome organization and adaptation. Inversely, understanding chromosome organization may shed further light on questions relating to replication and cell division. Ultimately, the understanding of the interplay between these different elements will allow a better understanding of bacterial genetics and evolution.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15184548