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© Research
Publication : Journal of bacteriology

The genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, an epidemic pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of bacteriology - 17 Oct 2008

Holden MT, Seth-Smith HM, Crossman LC, Sebaihia M, Bentley SD, Cerdeño-Tárraga AM, Thomson NR, Bason N, Quail MA, Sharp S, Cherevach I, Churcher C, Goodhead I, Hauser H, Holroyd N, Mungall K, Scott P, Walker D, White B, Rose H, Iversen P, Mil-Homens D, Rocha EP, Fialho AM, Baldwin A, Dowson C, Barrell BG, Govan JR, Vandamme P, Hart CA, Mahenthiralingam E, Parkhill J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18931103

J. Bacteriol. 2009 Jan;191(1):261-77

Bacterial infections of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients cause major complications in the treatment of this common genetic disease. Burkholderia cenocepacia infection is particularly problematic since this organism has high levels of antibiotic resistance, making it difficult to eradicate; the resulting chronic infections are associated with severe declines in lung function and increased mortality rates. B. cenocepacia strain J2315 was isolated from a CF patient and is a member of the epidemic ET12 lineage that originated in Canada or the United Kingdom and spread to Europe. The 8.06-Mb genome of this highly transmissible pathogen comprises three circular chromosomes and a plasmid and encodes a broad array of functions typical of this metabolically versatile genus, as well as numerous virulence and drug resistance functions. Although B. cenocepacia strains can be isolated from soil and can be pathogenic to both plants and man, J2315 is representative of a lineage of B. cenocepacia rarely isolated from the environment and which spreads between CF patients. Comparative analysis revealed that ca. 21% of the genome is unique in comparison to other strains of B. cenocepacia, highlighting the genomic plasticity of this species. Pseudogenes in virulence determinants suggest that the pathogenic response of J2315 may have been recently selected to promote persistence in the CF lung. The J2315 genome contains evidence that its unique and highly adapted genetic content has played a significant role in its success as an epidemic CF pathogen.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18931103