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© Thibaut Brunet
C. flexa colonies fixed at different stages of inversion
Publication : eLife

The evolutionary origin of bilaterian smooth and striated myocytes.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in eLife - 01 Dec 2016

Brunet T, Fischer AH, Steinmetz PR, Lauri A, Bertucci P, Arendt D,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 27906129

Link to DOI – 10.7554/eLife.19607e19607

Elife 2016 12; 5():

The dichotomy between smooth and striated myocytes is fundamental for bilaterian musculature, but its evolutionary origin is unsolved. In particular, interrelationships of visceral smooth muscles remain unclear. Absent in fly and nematode, they have not yet been characterized molecularly outside vertebrates. Here, we characterize expression profile, ultrastructure, contractility and innervation of the musculature in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii and identify smooth muscles around the midgut, hindgut and heart that resemble their vertebrate counterparts in molecular fingerprint, contraction speed and nervous control. Our data suggest that both visceral smooth and somatic striated myocytes were present in the protostome-deuterostome ancestor and that smooth myocytes later co-opted the striated contractile module repeatedly – for example, in vertebrate heart evolution. During these smooth-to-striated myocyte conversions, the core regulatory complex of transcription factors conveying myocyte identity remained unchanged, reflecting a general principle in cell type evolution.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27906129