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© Research
Publication : Biochemical and biophysical research communications

The C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II of the malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Biochemical and biophysical research communications - 14 Nov 1991

Giesecke H, Barale JC, Langsley G, Cornelissen AW

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 1840489

Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1991 Nov;180(3):1350-5

The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP) has an essential function in the regulation of transcription. The CTD of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, differs dramatically from that of higher eukaryotes. To determine whether this is a general feature of malarial parasites, we have analysed the CTD of the distantly related rodent malaria parasite P.berghei. The CTDs of the two parasites enzymes are very similar in amino acid composition and contain the basic structure of most eukaryotic CTDs, which is a tandem repeat of a heptapeptide (SPTSPSY). The CTD of P.berghei differs, however, in three aspects from the CTD of P.falciparum and other eukaryotes. First, both domains show a divergence from the consensus sequence at position 6 of the heptapeptide repeat. The Ser6 is always substituted, with a bias for lysine. The latter substitution might increase the binding efficiency to the DNA template. Second, the rodent and human malarial CTDs contain a 3′ extension of, respectively, 66 or 67 amino acid residues. This tail-piece is unique among eukaryotes. Third, the enlargement of the CTD of the human parasite by six heptapeptide repeats is most likely generated by a recent amplification of a specific repeat unit.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1840489