Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Pierre Gounon
Entrée de Listeria dans une cellule épithéliale (Grossissement X 10000). Image colorisée.
Publication : Molecular microbiology

The amino-terminal part of ActA is critical for the actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes; the central proline-rich region acts as a stimulator

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular microbiology - 01 Nov 1995

Lasa I, David V, Gouin E, Marchand JB, Cossart P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 8748027

Mol. Microbiol. 1995 Nov;18(3):425-36

The intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes moves inside the host-cell cytoplasm propelled by continuous actin assembly at one pole of the bacterium. This process requires expression of the bacterial surface protein ActA. Recently, in order to identify the regions of ActA which are required for actin assembly, we and others have expressed different domains of ActA by transfection in eukaryotic cells. As this type of approach cannot address the role of ActA in the actin-driven bacterial propulsion, we have now generated several L. monocytogenes strains expressing different domains of ActA and analysed the ability of the different domains to trigger actin assembly and bacterial movement in both infected cells and cytoplasmic extracts. We show here that the amino-terminal part is critical for F-actin assembly and movement. The internal proline-rich repeats and the carboxy-terminal domains are not essential. However, in vitro motility assays have demonstrated that mutants lacking the proline-rich repeats domain of ActA moved two times slower (6+/-2 micrometers min(-1)) than the wild type (13 +/-3 micrometers min(-1)). In addition, phosphatase treatment of protein extracts of cells infected with the L. monocytogenes strains expressing the ActA variants suggested that phosphorylation may not be essential for ActA activity.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8748027