Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Artur Scherf
Scanning Electron Microscopy of Red Blood Cell infected by Plasmodium falciparum.
Publication : The EMBO journal

The 11-1 gene of Plasmodium falciparum codes for distinct fast evolving repeats

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The EMBO journal - 01 Apr 1988

Scherf A, Hilbich C, Sieg K, Mattei D, Mercereau-Puijalon O, Müller-Hill B

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 2841111

EMBO J. 1988 Apr;7(4):1129-37

The 11-1 gene of Plasmodium falciparum has been investigated by DNA sequence analysis. It begins at the 5′ end with a putative miniexon coding for a polypeptide which has the characteristics of a signal sequence. The miniexon is followed by a small intron. This again is followed by a large exon consisting of 9-, 18- and 27-bp repeats embedded in unique DNA. Specific antibodies isolated by affinity chromatography on a purified recombinant fusion protein expressing the three- and six-amino acid repeats were used to identify the product of the 11-1 gene. In exhibits size variations from 260 to 350 kd in different strains. Southern blot analysis with synthetic DNA as probe demonstrates that the 18-bp repeat is absent or drastically altered in two strains whereas the other repeats are present in all seven strains investigated. The unusual preference for G in the third position of some codons of the repeats but not in the unique sequences indicates rapid evolution of the repeats. Slippage during replication, unequal crossing over and selection are discussed as possible mechanisms leading rapidly to extreme diversity.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2841111