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© Research
Publication : Journal of virology

Simultaneous cell-to-cell transmission of human immunodeficiency virus to multiple targets through polysynapses

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of virology - 15 Apr 2009

Rudnicka D, Feldmann J, Porrot F, Wietgrefe S, Guadagnini S, Prévost MC, Estaquier J, Haase AT, Sol-Foulon N, Schwartz O

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19369333

J. Virol. 2009 Jun;83(12):6234-46

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) efficiently propagates through cell-to-cell contacts, which include virological synapses (VS), filopodia, and nanotubes. Here, we quantified and characterized further these diverse modes of contact in lymphocytes. We report that viral transmission mainly occurs across VS and through “polysynapses,” a rosette-like structure formed between one infected cell and multiple adjacent recipients. Polysynapses are characterized by simultaneous HIV clustering and transfer at multiple membrane regions. HIV Gag proteins often adopt a ring-like supramolecular organization at sites of intercellular contacts and colocalize with CD63 tetraspanin and raft components GM1, Thy-1, and CD59. In donor cells engaged in polysynapses, there is no preferential accumulation of Gag proteins at contact sites facing the microtubule organizing center. The LFA-1 adhesion molecule, known to facilitate viral replication, enhances formation of polysynapses. Altogether, our results reveal an underestimated mode of viral transfer through polysynapses. In HIV-infected individuals, these structures, by promoting concomitant infection of multiple targets in the vicinity of infected cells, may facilitate exponential viral growth and escape from immune responses.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19369333