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© Melody Merle
Fluorescently labeled five day old gastruloid, a mouse embryonic stem-cell derived pseudo-embryo.
Publication : EMBO reports

Shifting meiotic to mitotic spindle assembly in oocytes disrupts chromosome alignment.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in EMBO reports - 01 Feb 2018

Bennabi I, Quéguiner I, Kolano A, Boudier T, Mailly P, Verlhac MH, Terret ME,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29330318

Link to DOI – 10.15252/embr.201745225

EMBO Rep 2018 02; 19(2): 368-381

Mitotic spindles assemble from two centrosomes, which are major microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) that contain centrioles. Meiotic spindles in oocytes, however, lack centrioles. In mouse oocytes, spindle microtubules are nucleated from multiple acentriolar MTOCs that are sorted and clustered prior to completion of spindle assembly in an “inside-out” mechanism, ending with establishment of the poles. We used HSET (kinesin-14) as a tool to shift meiotic spindle assembly toward a mitotic “outside-in” mode and analyzed the consequences on the fidelity of the division. We show that HSET levels must be tightly gated in meiosis I and that even slight overexpression of HSET forces spindle morphogenesis to become more mitotic-like: rapid spindle bipolarization and pole assembly coupled with focused poles. The unusual length of meiosis I is not sufficient to correct these early spindle morphogenesis defects, resulting in severe chromosome alignment abnormalities. Thus, the unique “inside-out” mechanism of meiotic spindle assembly is essential to prevent chromosomal misalignment and production of aneuploidy gametes.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29330318