Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Infection and immunity

ShiA abrogates the innate T-cell response to Shigella flexneri infection

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Infection and immunity - 01 Apr 2006

Ingersoll MA, Zychlinsky A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 16552062

Infect. Immun. 2006 Apr;74(4):2317-27

Shigella spp. are the causative agent of bacillary dysentery. Infection results in acute colonic injury due to the host inflammatory response. The mediators of the damage, infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), also resolve the infection. Shigella flexneri’s virulence effectors are encoded on its large virulence plasmid and on pathogenicity islands in the chromosome. The SHI-2 pathogenicity island encodes the virulence factor ShiA, which down-regulates Shigella-induced inflammation. In the rabbit ileal loop model, infection with a shiA null strain (DeltashiA) induces a more severe inflammation than wild-type infection. Conversely, a Shigella strain that overexpresses ShiA (ShiA+) is less inflammatory than the wild-type strain. To determine the host responses modulated by ShiA, we performed infection studies using the mouse lung model, which recapitulates the phenotypes observed in the rabbit ileal loop model. Significantly, ShiA+ strain-infected mice cleared the bacteria and survived infection, while wild-type- and DeltashiA strain-infected mice could not clear the bacteria and ultimately died. Surprisingly, microarray analysis of infected lungs revealed the regulation of genes involved in innate T-cell responses to infection. Immunohistochemistry showed that wild-type- and DeltashiA strain-infected animals have greater numbers of PMN and T cells in their lungs over the course of infection than ShiA+ strain-infected animals. These results suggest that the T-cell innate response is suppressed by ShiA in Shigella infections.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16552062