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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : Journal of bacteriology

Sensitive genetic screen for protease activity based on a cyclic AMP signaling cascade in Escherichia coli

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of bacteriology - 01 Dec 2000

Dautin N, Karimova G, Ullmann A, Ladant D

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11092869

J. Bacteriol. 2000 Dec;182(24):7060-6

We describe a genetic system that allows in vivo screening or selection of site-specific proteases and of their cognate-specific inhibitors in Escherichia coli. This genetic test is based on the specific proteolysis of a signaling enzyme, the adenylate cyclase (AC) of Bordetella pertussis. As a model system we used the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease. When an HIV protease processing site, p5, was inserted in frame into the AC polypeptide, the resulting ACp5 protein retained enzymatic activity and, when expressed in an E. coli cya strain, restored the Cya(+) phenotype. The HIV protease coexpressed in the same cells resulted in cleavage and inactivation of ACp5; the cells became Cya(-). When the entire HIV protease, including its adjacent processing sites, was inserted into the AC polypeptide, the resulting AC-HIV-Pr fusion protein, expressed in E. coli cya, was autoproteolysed and inactivated: the cells displayed Cya(-) phenotype. In the presence of the protease inhibitor indinavir or saquinavir, AC-HIV-Pr autoproteolysis was inhibited and the AC activity of the fusion protein was preserved; the cells were Cya(+). Protease variants resistant to particular inhibitors could be easily distinguished from the wild type, as the cells displayed a Cya(-) phenotype in the presence of these inhibitors. This genetic test could represent a powerful approach to screen for new proteolytic activities and for novel protease inhibitors. It could also be used to detect in patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy the emergence of HIV variants harboring antiprotease-resistant proteases.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11092869