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© Michel-Robert Popoff
Clostridium difficile en microscopie à contraste de phase. On distingue des bactéries sporulées, non sporulées et d'autres en cours de lyse (destruction). Bactérie de l'environnement (sol, eau, foin, sable), elle est à l'origine d'infections nosocomiales survenant après un traitement antibiotique : Clostridium difficile prédomine alors que les autres bactéries de la flore intestinale ont été détruites. L'infection peut provoquer deux types de pathologies graves : les colites pseudo-membraneuses dont l'origine est quasiment due à 100 % à C. difficile et la diarrhée post-antibiothérapie due à C. difficile dans 30 % des cas de ces diarrhées.
Publication : Molecular microbiology

S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase of Bacillus subtilis is closely related to archaebacterial counterparts

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular microbiology - 01 Jun 2000

Sekowska A, Coppée JY, Le Caer JP, Martin-Verstraete I, Danchin A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10844697

Mol. Microbiol. 2000 Jun;36(5):1135-47

Bacillus subtilis synthesizes polyamines by decarboxylating arginine to agmatine, which is subsequently hydrolysed to putrescine. Spermidine is synthesized from putrescine and decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dAdoMet). In Gram-negative bacteria and in eukaryotes, AdoMet is decarboxylated by an unusual ‘pyruvoyl’ AdoMet decarboxylase (SpeD), the catalytic pyruvoyl moiety of which is generated by serinolysis of an internal serine with self-cleavage of the protein at the upstream peptide bond. Neither the Gram-positive bacterial nor the archaeal counterpart of the Escherichia coli SpeD enzyme were known. We have identified the corresponding B. subtilis speD gene (formely ytcF). Heterologous expression of the cognate Methanococcus jannaschii protein, MJ0315, demonstrated that it displays the same activity as B. subtilis SpeD, indicating that spermidine biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria and in archaea follows a pathway very similar to that of Gram-negatives and eukarya. In B. subtilis, transcription of speD is modulated by spermidine and methionine. Its expression is high under usual growth conditions. In contrast, the SpeD protein self-cleaves slowly in vitro, a noticeable difference with its archaeal counterpart. Under certain growth conditions (minimal medium containing succinate and glutamate as a carbon source), speD is co-transcribed with gapB, the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an enzyme required for gluconeogenesis. This observation may couple polyamine metabolism to sulphur and carbon metabolism by a so far unknown mechanism.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10844697