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© Research
Publication : Clinical and experimental immunology

Role of IgG and complement component C5 in the initial course of experimental cryptococcosis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Clinical and experimental immunology - 01 Dec 1989

Dromer F, Perronne C, Barge J, Vilde JL, Yeni P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 2612053

Clin. Exp. Immunol. 1989 Dec;78(3):412-7

Although cellular immunity has a crucial role during cryptococcosis, several in vitro studies have pointed out the importance of IgG anti-Cryptococcus neoformans antibodies and complement components during phagocytosis of the yeast by polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes. We investigated the role of complement and specific antibodies in host defences against experimental cryptococcosis, using a monoclonal IgG1 antibody (E1) specific for cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide, and mice congenitally sufficient or deficient in the fifth component of complement (C5). During in vitro experiments, E1 and the normal mouse serum from C5-sufficient and -deficient mice were unable to inhibit the growth of C.neoformans. However, E1 was an efficient opsonin for the ingestion of C. neoformans by mouse peritoneal macrophages, acting in synergy with normal mouse serum. In vivo, E1 was protective in heavily infected C5-deficient mice (DBA/2) dying from an early acute pneumonia, but not in C5-sufficient mice (BALB/c) and in DBA/2 mice infected with a smaller inoculum dying from a late progressive meningo-encephalitis. Although protection against pneumonia is attributed to a local recruitment of phagocytes in C5-sufficient mice, this was not observed in C5-deficient mice protected with E1. In this case, IgG anti-C. neoformans antibodies seem to be an alternative for an efficient opsonization of the yeasts. Altogether, these data suggest that two main mechanisms may protect infected mice from an early fatal pneumonia: the efficient opsonization of the yeast by complement and the recruitment of phagocytes in infected tissues.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2612053