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© Xavier Montagutelli, Institut Pasteur
Publication : Gastroenterology

Protoporphyrin retention in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells prevents sclerosing cholangitis in erythropoietic protoporphyria mouse model

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Gastroenterology - 14 Jul 2011

Lyoumi S, Abitbol M, Rainteau D, Karim Z, Bernex F, Oustric V, Millot S, Lettéron P, Heming N, Guillmot L, Montagutelli X, Berdeaux G, Gouya L, Poupon R, Deybach JC, Beaumont C, Puy H

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21762662

Gastroenterology 2011 Oct;141(4):1509-19, 1519.e1-3

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Chronic, progressive hepatobiliary disease is the most severe complication of erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) and can require liver transplantation, although the mechanisms that lead to liver failure are unknown. We characterized protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX)-linked hepatobiliary disease in BALB/c and C57BL/6 (Fechm1Pas) mice with mutations in ferrochelatase as models for EPP.

METHODS: Fechm1Pas and wild-type (control) mice were studied at 12-14 weeks of age. PPIX was quantified; its distribution in the liver, serum levels of lipoprotein-X, liver histology, contents of bile salt and cholesterol phospholipids, and expression of genes were compared in mice of the BALB/c and C57BL/6 backgrounds. The in vitro binding affinity of PPIX for bile components was determined.

RESULTS: Compared with mice of the C57BL/6 background, BALB/c Fechm1Pas mice had a more severe pattern of cholestasis, fibrosis with portoportal bridging, bile acid regurgitation, sclerosing cholangitis, and hepatolithiasis. In C57BL/6 Fechm1Pas mice, PPIX was sequestrated mainly in the cytosol of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells, whereas, in BALB/c Fechm1Pas mice, PPIX was localized within enlarged bile canaliculi. Livers of C57BL/6 Fechm1Pas mice were protected through a combination of lower efflux of PPIX and reduced synthesis and export of bile acid.

CONCLUSIONS: PPIX binds to bile components and disrupts the physiologic equilibrium of phospholipids, bile acids, and cholesterol in bile. This process might be involved in pathogenesis of sclerosing cholangitis from EPP; a better understanding might improve diagnosis and development of reagents to treat or prevent liver failure in patients with EPP.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21762662