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© Research
Publication : Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy

Proinflammatory macrophages enhance the regenerative capacity of human myoblasts by modifying their kinetics of proliferation and differentiation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy - 16 Oct 2012

Bencze M, Negroni E, Vallese D, Yacoub-Youssef H, Chaouch S, Wolff A, Aamiri A, Di Santo JP, Chazaud B, Butler-Browne G, Savino W, Mouly V, Riederer I

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23070116

Mol. Ther. 2012 Nov;20(11):2168-79

Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2(-/-) γC(-/-) immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23070116