Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Pierre Gounon
Entrée de Listeria dans une cellule épithéliale (Grossissement X 10000). Image colorisée.
Publication : Journal of cell science

Polarized distribution of Listeria monocytogenes surface protein ActA at the site of directional actin assembly

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 01 Jul 1993

Kocks C, Hellio R, Gounon P, Ohayon H, Cossart P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 8408297

J. Cell. Sci. 1993 Jul;105 ( Pt 3):699-710

The facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can infect host tissues by using directional actin assembly to propel itself from one cell into another. The movement is generated by continuous actin assembly from one end of the bacterium into a tail, which is left behind in the cytoplasm. Bacterial actin assembly requires expression of the bacterial gene actA. We have used immunocytochemistry to show that the actA gene product, ActA, is distributed asymmetrically on the bacterial surface: it is not expressed at one pole and is increasingly concentrated towards the other. This polarized distribution of ActA was linked to bacterial division: ActA protein was not, or only faintly, expressed at the pole that had been formed during the previous division. On intracellular bacteria ActA was expressed at the site of actin assembly, suggesting that ActA may be involved in actin filament nucleation off the bacterial surface. We predict that the asymmetrical distribution of this protein is required for the ability of intracellular Listeria to move in the direction of the non-ActA expressing pole.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8408297