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© Research
Publication : The Journal of biological chemistry

Nucleotide sequence of the overlapping genes for the subunits of Bacillus subtilis aspartokinase II and their control regions

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of biological chemistry - 25 Jun 1987

Chen NY, Hu FM, Paulus H

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 3036830

J. Biol. Chem. 1987 Jun;262(18):8787-98

The nucleotide sequence of a 2.9-kilobase Bacillus subtilis DNA fragment containing the entire coding region of aspartokinase II and adjacent chromosomal regions (Bondaryk, R. P., and Paulus, H. (1985a) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 585-591) has been determined. The results confirmed the earlier prediction that the two subunits of aspartokinase II, alpha and beta, are encoded by in-phase overlapping genes. The nucleotide sequence showed strong ribosome binding sites before the translation initiation codons of the alpha and beta subunits. Deletion of most of the coding region unique to the alpha subunit had no effect on the synthesis of the smaller beta subunit, demonstrating that the beta subunit is indeed the product of independent translation. The site of transcription initiation of the aspartokinase gene was found to be more than 300 nucleotides upstream from the translation start of the alpha subunit. The intervening region contained a short reading frame capable of encoding a 24-residue lysine-rich polypeptide, which overlaps a region of extensive dyad symmetry culminating in a rho-independent transcription terminator. This region may be an attenuator control element that regulates the expression of the aspartokinase gene in response to the availability of lysine, the end product of the pathway. The coding sequence of the aspartokinase II subunits was immediately followed by a rho-independent transcription terminator. This termination site has an unusual symmetry, which allows it also to serve as transcription terminator for a gene that converges on the aspartokinase II gene from the opposite direction, an interesting example of genetic economy. The deduced amino acid sequence of B. subtilis aspartokinase II was compared with the sequences of the three aspartokinases from Escherichia coli (Cassan, M., Parsot, C., Cohen, G. N., and Patte, J. C. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1052-1057). Significant sequence similarities suggest a close evolutionary relationship between the four enzymes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3036830