Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Pierre Gounon
Entrée de Listeria dans une cellule épithéliale (Grossissement X 10000). Image colorisée.
Publication : Cellular microbiology

Nexilin is a dynamic component of Listeria monocytogenes and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli actin-rich structures

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Cellular microbiology - 28 Mar 2012

Law HT, Bonazzi M, Jackson J, Cossart P, Guttman JA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22381134

Cell. Microbiol. 2012 Jul;14(7):1097-108

The bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) generate motile actin-rich structures (comet tails and pedestals) as part of their infectious processes. Nexilin, an actin-associated protein and a component of focal adhesions, has been suggested to be involved in actin-based motility. To determine whether nexilin is commandeered during L. monocytogenes and EPEC infections, we infected cultured cells and found that nexilin is crucial for L. monocytogenes invasion as levels of internalized bacteria were significantly decreased in nexilin-targeted siRNA-treated cells. In addition, nexilin is a component of the machinery that drives the formation of L. monocytogenes comet tails and EPEC pedestals. Nexilin colocalizes with stationary bacteria and accumulates at the distal portion of comet tails and pedestals of motile bacteria. We also show that nexilin is crucial for efficient comet tail formation as cells pre-treated with nexilin siRNA generate malformed comet tails, whereas nexilin is dispensable during EPEC pedestal generation. These findings demonstrate that nexilin is required for efficient infection with invasive and adherent bacteria and is key to the actin-rich structures these microbes generate.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22381134