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© Research
Publication : Nature communications

Neolithic mitochondrial haplogroup H genomes and the genetic origins of Europeans

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nature communications - 01 Jan 2013

Brotherton P, Haak W, Templeton J, Brandt G, Soubrier J, Jane Adler C, Richards SM, Sarkissian CD, Ganslmeier R, Friederich S, Dresely V, van Oven M, Kenyon R, Van der Hoek MB, Korlach J, Luong K, Ho SY, Quintana-Murci L, Behar DM, Meller H, Alt KW, Cooper A, , Adhikarla S, Ganesh Prasad AK, Pitchappan R, Varatharajan Santhakumari A, Balanovska E, Balanovsky O, Bertranpetit J, Comas D, Martínez-Cruz B, Melé M, Clarke AC, Matisoo-Smith EA, Dulik MC, Gaieski JB, Owings AC, Schurr TG, Vilar MG, Hobbs A, Soodyall H, Javed A, Parida L, Platt DE, Royyuru AK, Jin L, Li S, Kaplan ME, Merchant NC, John Mitchell R, Renfrew C, Lacerda DR, Santos FR, Soria Hernanz DF, Spencer Wells R, Swamikrishnan P, Tyler-Smith C, Paulo Vieira P, Ziegle JS

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23612305

Nat Commun 2013;4:1764

Haplogroup H dominates present-day Western European mitochondrial DNA variability (>40%), yet was less common (~19%) among Early Neolithic farmers (~5450 BC) and virtually absent in Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. Here we investigate this major component of the maternal population history of modern Europeans and sequence 39 complete haplogroup H mitochondrial genomes from ancient human remains. We then compare this ‘real-time’ genetic data with cultural changes taking place between the Early Neolithic (~5450 BC) and Bronze Age (~2200 BC) in Central Europe. Our results reveal that the current diversity and distribution of haplogroup H were largely established by the Mid Neolithic (~4000 BC), but with substantial genetic contributions from subsequent pan-European cultures such as the Bell Beakers expanding out of Iberia in the Late Neolithic (~2800 BC). Dated haplogroup H genomes allow us to reconstruct the recent evolutionary history of haplogroup H and reveal a mutation rate 45% higher than current estimates for human mitochondria.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23612305