Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Genes and immunity

Mus spretus SEG/Pas mice resist virulent Yersinia pestis, under multigenic control

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Genes and immunity - 23 Sep 2010

Blanchet C, Jaubert J, Carniel E, Fayolle C, Milon G, Szatanik M, Panthier JJ, Montagutelli X

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 20861861

Genes Immun. 2011 Jan;12(1):23-30

Laboratory mice are well known to be highly susceptible to virulent strains of Yersinia pestis in experimental models of bubonic plague. We have found that Mus spretus-derived SEG/Pas (SEG) mice are exceptionally resistant to virulent CO92 and 6/69 wild type strains. Upon subcutaneous injection of 10(2) colony-forming units (CFU), 90% of females and 68% of males survived, compared with only an 8% survival rate for both male and female C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, half of the SEG mice survived a challenge of up to 10(7) CFU. The time required for mortality was similar between B6 and SEG, suggesting that survival is dependent on early rather than late processes. The analysis of 322 backcross mice identified three significant quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosomes 3, 4 and 6, with dominant SEG protective alleles. Each QTL increased the survival rate by approximately 20%. The three QTLs function additively, thereby accounting for 67% of the difference between the parental phenotypes. Mice heterozygous for the three QTLs were just as resistant as SEG mice to Y. pestis challenge. The SEG strain therefore offers an invaluable opportunity to unravel mechanisms and underlying genetic factors of resistance against Y. pestis infection.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20861861