Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Research in microbiology

Molecular typing of Chlamydia trachomatis by random amplification of polymorphic DNA

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Research in microbiology - 01 Jun 1993

Scieux C, Grimont F, Regnault B, Bianchi A, Kowalski S, Grimont PA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 7902599

Res. Microbiol. 1993 Jun;144(5):395-404

The random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used for epidemiological typing of Chlamydia trachomatis strains. DNA samples from 39 C. trachomatis, 1 C. pneumoniae and 2 C. psittaci strains were screened by the use of 4 single 10-mer primers. Different and reproducible banding profiles were observed on agarose gel electrophoresis. No common profiles were recorded for strains from different Chlamydia species. All C. trachomatis strains of trachoma biovar were distinguished from lymphogranuloma venereum biovar. Moreover, serotypes A to C were separated from serotypes D to K, and some groups of strains sharing the same serotype D to K were further subdivided by RAPD. Conversely, strains of different serotypes could produce identical patterns of amplification, indicating that RAPD did not reflect serotyping. The patterns of amplified products were compared to the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the omp1 gene after amplification and to DNA fingerprinting by use of ribosomal RNA or randomly cloned DNA probes. RAPD seemed to be an alternative molecular typing procedure for epidemiological study and strain identification in urogenital infections due to serotypes D to K.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7902599