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© Marion Coolen
Radial glia neural stem cells of the adult zebrafish telencephalon electroporated with a membrane tagged GFP
Publication : The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Modulation of Fgfr1a signaling in zebrafish reveals a genetic basis for the aggression-boldness syndrome

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience - 28 Sep 2011

Norton WH, Stumpenhorst K, Faus-Kessler T, Folchert A, Rohner N, Harris MP, Callebert J, Bally-Cuif L

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21957242

J. Neurosci. 2011 Sep;31(39):13796-807

Behavioral syndromes are suites of two or more behaviors that correlate across environmental contexts. The aggression-boldness syndrome links aggression, boldness, and exploratory activity in a novel environment. Although aggression-boldness has been described in many animals, the mechanism linking its behavioral components is not known. Here we show that mutation of the gene encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 1a (fgfr1a) simultaneously increases aggression, boldness, and exploration in adult zebrafish. We demonstrate that altered Fgf signaling also results in reduced brain histamine levels in mutants. Pharmacological increase of histamine signaling is sufficient to rescue the behavioral phenotype of fgfr1a mutants. Together, we show that a single genetic locus can underlie the aggression-boldness behavioral syndrome. We also identify one of the neurotransmitter pathways that may mediate clustering of these behaviors.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21957242