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Published in PLoS neglected tropical diseases - 15 Feb 2018

Oliveira M, Lert-Itthiporn W, Cavadas B, Fernandes V, Chuansumrit A, Anunciação O, Casademont I, Koeth F, Penova M, Tangnararatchakit K, Khor CC, Paul R, Malasit P, Matsuda F, Simon-Lorière E, Suriyaphol P, Pereira L, Sakuntabhai A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29447178

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018 02;12(2):e0006202

Ethnic diversity has been long considered as one of the factors explaining why the severe forms of dengue are more prevalent in Southeast Asia than anywhere else. Here we take advantage of the admixed profile of Southeast Asians to perform coupled association-admixture analyses in Thai cohorts. For dengue shock syndrome (DSS), the significant haplotypes are located in genes coding for phospholipase C members (PLCB4 added to previously reported PLCE1), related to inflammation of blood vessels. For dengue fever (DF), we found evidence of significant association with CHST10, AHRR, PPP2R5E and GRIP1 genes, which participate in the xenobiotic metabolism signaling pathway. We conducted functional analyses for PPP2R5E, revealing by immunofluorescence imaging that the coded protein co-localizes with both DENV1 and DENV2 NS5 proteins. Interestingly, only DENV2-NS5 migrated to the nucleus, and a deletion of the predicted top-linking motif in NS5 abolished the nuclear transfer. These observations support the existence of differences between serotypes in their cellular dynamics, which may contribute to differential infection outcome risk. The contribution of the identified genes to the genetic risk render Southeast and Northeast Asian populations more susceptible to both phenotypes, while African populations are best protected against DSS and intermediately protected against DF, and Europeans the best protected against DF but the most susceptible against DSS.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29447178