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© Matteo Bonazzi, Edith Gouin
Observation en immunofluorescence d'une cellule infectée par Listeria monocytogenes. En bleu: marquage des protéines de surface de Listeria qui permet de visualiser les bactéries. En rouge et vert: marquage de l'actine, une protéine qui forme le cytosquelette des cellules. Les Listeria utilisent l'actine cellulaire pour former des "comêtes" et se déplacer à l'intérieur des cellules qu'elles infectent. Cell infected by Listeria monocytogenes. The surface proteins (in blue) of Listeria enable us to view the bacteria. Actin, a constituent protein of cells, is shown in red and green.
Publication : Blood

Intravenous immune globulin prevents venular vaso-occlusion in sickle cell mice by inhibiting leukocyte adhesion and the interactions between sickle erythrocytes and adherent leukocytes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Blood - 20 Nov 2003

Turhan A, Jenab P, Bruhns P, Ravetch JV, Coller BS, Frenette PS

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 14630831

Blood 2004 Mar;103(6):2397-400

Sickle cell vaso-occlusion is a complex multistep process likely involving heterotypic interactions among sickle erythrocytes (red blood cells [RBCs]), leukocytes (white blood cells [WBCs]), and endothelial cells. Recent data using intravital microscopy in a sickle cell mouse model suggest that adherent leukocytes in postcapillary venules play a critical role in vaso-occlusion by capturing circulating sickle RBCs. In the course of studies to investigate the adhesion receptors mediating sickle RBC-WBC interactions, we found that control nonspecific immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations displayed significant inhibitory activity. As a result, we studied the effects of commercial intravenous human immune globulin (i.v.IG) preparations and found that i.v.IG inhibits RBC-WBC interactions in cremasteric venules in a dose-dependent manner. i.v.IG of at least 200 mg/kg dramatically reduced these interactions, even after tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulation, and not only increased microcirculatory blood flow but also improved survival of sickle cell mice. These data raise the possibility that i.v.IG may have a beneficial effect on sickle cell-associated vaso-occlusion.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14630831